July 2, 2022
  • July 2, 2022

What you missed at the eGames Awards 2022

By on May 14, 2022 0

Editor’s Note: This story was adapted for WRAL TechWire from a blog post originally published by North Carolina State University, with permission.

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RALEIGH- Homegrown startups delivered another impressive performance at the 2022 eGames Awards Ceremony.

The eGames was launched in 2009 as an annual startup competition, and the latest event saw more than $100,000 in cash prizes awarded to entrepreneurs with ties to North Carolina State University, which hosts the competition.

Students can participate in a student competition and qualified startups that have developed technology licensed to North Carolina State University can participate in a competition along the Girl endowment track.

While 49 student teams participated in the competition, only 10 reached the final.

“I love seeing the creative energy that emanates from the teams that come to eGames. This year was no exception. The energy and excitement also spilled over into the exhibit. You know it was a successful event when people are still deeply engaged in conversations at the end of the evening,” said Dr. Tom Miller, Senior Vice Provost for Entrepreneurship and McPherson Family Professor Emeritus.

NCSU eGames features 15 startups vying for over $100,000 in prizes

Students “think” and “do”

As part of the student competition, startups fall into two categories, either “Think” or “Do”.

And all companies that present at the eGames are eligible to compete for prizes in the areas of social impact, design, arts and cloud technology.

The Cervu team takes the stage for the first live elevator pitch of the evening

So who won ?

In the “Think” category, which is aimed at startups in early development, operating with a concept and seeking customers for a first product or seeking additional customer validation, the winners were:

  • First place and $9,000 went to Spir Medical, which is creating a valve mask resuscitation device.
  • Second place and $7,000 went to Rampart Crop Defense, which fights crop death by preventing late blight.
  • Third place, and $4,000, went to Cervu, which aims to improve access to care and the efficiency of the PTFP to lead to better outcomes.

The “Do” category represents student teams looking to grow or scale their business. These teams may have investments, customers, or functional products that they are looking to bring to market at scale.

The winners of the student competition in the “Do” category, which consisted of teams looking to scale an existing business that has already proven itself in their market, were:

  • First place and a $10,000 prize went to Wolfpack Medical, which is working to commercialize the Sawyer Junctional tourniquet, an emergency trauma tourniquet.
  • Second place and an $8,500 prize went to Dyelation, which creates a long-lasting and exclusive thermoglow ink for clothing.
  • Third place and $6,500 went to ByteSize Learning, the developer of a series of fun and engaging learning courses designed for elementary through high school students.
eGames Judge Chisa Brookes Meets Straight Shot People’s Choice Winners

Girl endowment track

In the Daughtery Endowment Track, companies presented prizes worth up to $25,000.

First-place winner Vizma Life Sciences, which is developing low-cost, next-generation molecular imaging as an alternative to existing medical imaging technologies to deliver unprecedented, safer and more convenient diagnostic power, won $25,000 .

Second place, Mammae Biosciences, won $15,000. The company will continue to work towards commercializing a cost-effective and scalable method of producing LacNAc, a key probiotic and health-promoting human milk oligosaccharide (HMO), to meet growing consumer demand for foods containing HMO.

And, rounding out the cash prize winners, DNAli Data Technologies took third place and $10,000. The startup is developing an end-to-end DNA data storage platform to enable durable and eternally relevant data storage that is also sustainable and environmentally friendly.

©North Carolina State University